Dr. Clay Siegall Using Start-Up Strategy To Fight Cancer

Some start-ups have grand visions of changing the world. For Dr. Clay Siegall, his company was tackling one of mankind’s greatest challenges – Cancer. It’s a fight that the entrepreneur and researcher battles and with the finest minds in science.

Seattle Genetics CEO Dr. Clay Siegall has led his company from its tiny start-up days to one of the biggest players in the cancer research space. Dr. Siegall’s targeted therapy drugs have found themselves in the pipeline for approval thanks to a partnership with big-name pharma players including Pfizer, Genentech, and Bayer to name a few.

Furthermore, Dr. Clay Siegall wants to do away with systematic chemotherapies and bring more effective and more tolerable cancer treatments to the marketplace. In a recent interview, Dr. Siegall laid out his thoughts on how to improve cancer treatments in the future.

When asked what inspired Dr. Siegall to enter the cancer drug space, the researcher answered that he was interested in blending technology and medicine in order to heal people and treat disease. Siegall’s inspiration to start Seattle Genetics also came from a close family member whom he saw suffer greatly from a brutal treatment regimen.

When asked how he got his first client, Dr. Siegall revealed that he relied on a dedicated sales staff to help him spread Seattle Genetics’ message to the big pharma players. It was a long road, Dr. Siegall said, that was worth the tribulation.

Dr. Siegall finally mentioned that nothing is a substitute for hard work. He pointed out that most people in the cancer research space have the same level of intellect but it is the intensity and consistency of work habits which separated the success stories from the failures.

Dr. Clay Siegall co-founded Seattle Genetics in 1998 and is currently the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the company. Dr. Siegall holds a Bachelors of Science Degree from the University of Maryland and a Doctorate Degree in Genetics from George Washington University.